Reparations: A Blueprint to address systemic police violence

The City of Chicago made history on Wednesday May 6 when it passed legislation providing reparations to survivors of racially motivated police torture committed between 1972 and 1991. Once implemented, it will offer a measure of hope to survivors, their family members and African American communities devastated by the legacy of torture committed by infamous former Chicago Police Commander Jon Burge and detectives under his command.

Baltimore Needs Much More than Just Indictments

Photo by Devin Allen (

by Oren Nimni, TUPOCC Chair and Sharlyn Grace, National Vice President

As police violence against Black community members and protesters continued this week in Baltimore, we were again reminded why we are proud to be a part of the National Lawyers Guild. The NLG quickly worked with other groups to mobilize legal support for the #BaltimoreUprising by assisting through Legal Observation, jail support, and legal defense coordination for those protesting the police murder of Freddie Gray.

Risen Case Leads Organizations to Push for a Shield Law that Wouldn’t Protect Risen

James Risen

After a setback last week, where the Supreme Court refused to intervene to prevent the DOJ from forcing New York Times reporter James Risen from testifying against a source, several First Amendment groups are calling for Congress to rush to pass a law to make sure he and future reporters aren't forced to testify.

Suffolk University: Partner in Armenian Genocide Denial?

Armenians crucified during genocide
Heidi Boghosian

Students at Suffolk University Law School are urging the school’s president to withdraw its invitation to Armenian genocide denier Abraham Foxman to speak at their commencement and receive an honorary degree. Foxman, the Anti-Defamation League director, drew harsh public criticism in 2007 for opposing a congressional resolution acknowledging the 1915 extermination of approximately 1.5 million Armenians.

Hugo Chávez: Gone for a Year, But Still Looming Large

A year after the death of Hugo Chávez is a propitious time to examine his legacy. Such an examination is even more important in light of the current wave of demonstrations in Venezuela, which have given new life to the transparent attempts of the opposition and the United States to depose the Bolivarian government. These demonstrations appear to be organized by an especially violent and reactionary sector of the opposition, seeking overthrow rather than democratic change.

50 Years Gone: Reflections on the JFK Assassination

Fifty years ago today, President John F. Kennedy was killed in Dallas. For those of us who were alive and sentient back then, it was a signal event. JFK was the first of a new generation of leadership for the country, and held the promise, as it were, for hope and change. We will never know if his death also killed, or at least wounded, those expectations or whether the Johnson administration held to Kennedy’s vision. JFK opposed the historic March on Washington and was unable to pass civil rights legislation. That accomplishment was left to Lyndon Johnson, in the wake of Martin Luther King’s assassination and the rebellions that followed in cities across the country.