torture

Is there hope for the rule of law?

Guantanamo captives in 2002. Public domain photo by Petty Officer 1st class Shane T. McCoy, U.S. Navy.

The Supreme Court’s decision in Clapper vs Amnesty Int’l  has now made it nearly impossibly to review through civil lawsuits many of the government’s most egregious tactics in the war on terror. While the decision in Clapper is new, it reflects a continuing saga of a war not on terror, but on the rule of law. Another part of that saga has involved our government’s treatment of, and denial of due process to, those accused of terrorism.

Letter Regarding the Nomination of John Brennan to Head the CIA

The National Lawyers Guild writes to express its opposition to the nomination of John Brennan to head the Central Intelligence Agency. As President Obama’s current counter-terrorism adviser, Brennan bears responsibility for the administration’s drone program, which is killing civilians and sowing anti-American sentiment throughout the world. Brennan also stands accused of having detailed, contemporaneous knowledge of the use of “enhanced interrogation techniques” on captured terrorism suspects during the Bush administration. The impact and legality of the drone program and the extent of Brennan’s involvement in the Bush torture program should be central questions at his Senate Intelligence Committee confirmation hearing.

Volume 69, No. 4

NLG Review Volume 69, Number 4 includes the following articles:

  • The Future of Diversity by Erwin Chemerinsky
  • I Beg Your Pardon: Maintaining the Absolute Ban on Torture Through the Presidential Pardon by Stacy Cammarano
  • Social Justice in Turbulent Times: Critical Race Theory and Occupy Wall Street by Nick J. Sciullo
  • Toward the Heart of Justice by Richael Faithful
  • A review by Anne O'Berry of the book Rendition to Torture
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