surveillance

NLG Releases Report on Government Spying on Legal Profession, Launches FBI FOIA Project

April 24, 2014

The new report brings to light the government’s long history of covert surveillance of attorneys and their activist clients. The release also marks the launch of a new NLG Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) project that seeks to recover FBI files on individual Guild members as exposed by the 1977 case, National Lawyers Guild v. Attorney General of the United States.

Breach of Privilege: Spying on Lawyers in the United States

In Breach of Privilege: Spying on Lawyers in the United States, NLG Senior Researcher Traci Yoder gives a comprehensive analysis of covert government spying on the legal profession and its detrimental impact on the attorney-client privilege. A resource for scholars, lawyers, and activists, the report opens with the Guild’s own story of surveillance, outlining the tactics developed to undermine zealous lawyering. As Yoder demonstrates, these actions against the Guild marked the precursor to J.

The Business of Surveillance

Human Rights Magazine
February 16, 2014

It is at once revealing and disturbing that the American retailing company Target can learn of a teenager’s pregnancy before the family she lives with does. An angry father near Minneapolis found this out firsthand, as reported in the New York Times, revealing a modern-day quandary: Communications and information technology have advanced with such speed that privacy safeguards lag far behind.

Abdeen Jabara on Law and Disorder Radio

Law and Disorder Radio
November 25, 2013

On October 11, 1985, prominent Palestinian-American leader Alex Odeh was killed by a pipe bomb at the offices of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, where he worked as the group’s western regional director in Santa Ana, California. Now, the FBI and Justice Department are being urged to renew its investigation into this shocking political murder.

Ninth Circuit allows suit challenging military surveillance

Army surveillance, like Army regimentation, is at war with the principles of the First Amendment. . . There can be no influence more paralyzing of that objective than Army surveillance. When an intelligence officer looks over every nonconformist’s shoulder in the library, or walks invisibly by his side in a picket line, or infiltrates his club, the America once extolled as the voice of liberty heard around the world no longer is cast in the image which Jefferson and Madison designed . . .

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